Our Adventures in the Outback

Group photo at Uluru
Carrie, Julius, Michele and Glenn - the four intreped travelers at Uluru.

Page 6:
Uluru
After another sizzlin’ bacon breakfast, we joined scores of people at Uluru, a.k.a. Ayers Rock, for a free guided tour. Unable to hear well, especially the soft voice and unfamiliar cadence of the Aboriginal ranger leading the tour, we soon started the 7-mile trek around the big rock on our own.
Uluru at dawn
The Aboriginal people “read” the features of the rock like scripture, weaving stories that tell how to behave and interact with integrity.
Uluru Story
There is a story about a dishonest hunter who gets his
comeuppance told by the features in this rock face.

Whole Rock

There are different areas sacred to the native men and women, neither of which should be photographed, because the opposite gender is not privy to that knowledge and may not see those sites. (None of these areas appear on this page.) Stories must be told
only in the context of the place they happened. The boys are separated from the women folk as they reach puberty and begin learning from the adult men of how to become men. Adult women teach girls about plants, medicine and food preparation, as well as how to choose a husband.
Cave
The "Kitchen" Cave
Sign
Our hike around Uluru continues.
Whale
We called this section "The Whale."
Michele
Michele, suitably awed, admiring the natural beauty and wonder.
Desktop
It's really hard to give a sense of scale in a phtograph. Try to imagine walking for 6 hours and being continually gobsmacked by the sights around every bend.
Streaks Water Hole
The soft curves of the red sandstone form a heart around the tree in the center, overlooking Uluru's sacred water hole.


Hump
Rounding one of the ends of the massive structure.
Carrie and Michele
As our hike around the mighty Uluru is nearing completion, Carrie and Michele's exurberance is dwarfed by the sheer magnitude of the primordial formation.

Glenn at grill That evening back in the “food court” Glenn and Julius grilled kangaroo, crocodile, emu and barramundi (a local fish), and we all enjoyed the all-you-can-eat salad bar.
With chill and rain beyond the warm cocoon of the heaters, we hunkered down in the communal dining area for an evening of wine and euchre while listening to the talented musician playing guitar and singing familiar songs on the stage directly in front of us. Much to our surprise, our tents had withstood the teeming rains, and our bedding was warm and dry
.
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Last Updated November 11, 2017
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Website contents 2017 by Glenn Simonelli & Michele Stone.
Photographs by Julius Simonelli, Carrie Wallace, Glenn Simonelli & Michele Stone